Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Raising Awareness for Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia (ATN) - Black Hills 100 Race Training (Sunday, June 14)

Raising Awareness for Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia (ATN) - Black Hills 100 Race Training (Sunday, June 14)


Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia (ATN) - What research is being done?

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), a part of the National Institutes of Health, is the federal government’s leading supporter of biomedical research on disorders of the brain and nervous system. NINDS-funded projects are exploring the mechanisms involved with chronic pain and trigeminal neuralgia, as well as novel diagnostic methods and treatments. Other research addresses TN through studies associated with pain research. Additional NIH research on TN is being funded by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.

One NINDS-funded study for people with post-herpetic neuralgia of the trigeminal nerve uses a nasal spray applicator to deliver a drug to the tissue that lines the nasal cavity (nasal mucosa). Current drug therapy is absorbed through the body, which may lead to adverse effects such as drug interactions.  The local drug delivery affects nerve endings and suppresses the activity of neurotransmitters (which help cells communicate with each other), which makes the trigeminal nerve less able to transmit pain. The study will monitor people’s daily assessment of overall pain and note any adverse effects.

Little is known about how the nervous system becomes closely aligned with the vascular system during development. Scientists are using a mouse model to understand this interaction, which may lead to better diagnosis, therapy, and prevention of several neurological diseases, including diabetic neuropathy and TN.

Women are at a greater risk for pain in many acute and chronic pain conditions (including TN), but the reasons behind this aren’t well understood. Researchers are looking at the role estrogens may play in affecting nerve pain activity.  Understanding estrogen activity on pain nerves may increase the knowledge of why women are at risk for pain and possibly lead to the development of compounds that dampen the activity of estrogen on nerves that send pain signals to the brain and spinal cord.

source:  http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/trigeminal_neuralgia/detail_trigeminal_neuralgia.htm

Black Hills 100 Race Training (13 days to race day)

Day off from training today.

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